They say that there is no such thing as bad publicity, but that is not the reality. In truth, bad publicity is a terrible thing. Yes, it gets your business noticed, but for all the wrong reasons and it is unlikely that anyone will want to buy your products and services if the bad press is something that upsets and concerns them. This is why it is so important to avoid bad publicity wherever possible (and to have a great PR company at hand to help you if it isn’t). Here are some ways you can do it.

Be careful addressing controversial topics

It’s good to be relevant and stay on top of what is trending in the news and on social media, but don’t just grab at a hashtag and use it without thinking of the consequences, and don’t voice your opinion on a controversial matter without considering the fallout, even if you do come down on one side or the other.

In business, you need to appeal to a wide range of people. Although consumers these days expect brands to get involved and speak out on cultural and societal issues, be aware that picking a side when something happens in the news will mean potentially alienating half of your clientele. It might be better to stay silent and concentrate on building up your business rather than speaking out and risking losing business.

Use reputable products and technology

By investing in the best products and technology, created by reputable companies with good reviews, and keeping yourself as up to date as possible, you can prove to those who might be wondering that you are a forward-thinking company. This goes on to show that you can be relied on and that you are not behind the times or out of date yourself. The latest tools don’t have to cost the earth either, as you will find if you work in engineering, for example, by checking out the Circuit Studio price for making PCBs. This will do your reputation a lot of good to be able to show that you are really thinking of the future.

Companies that use older products are not only showing the world that they are not interested in updating or using the best available, but they are also leaving themselves open to potential cyber attack, and this is yet another reason to ensure you use up to date, reputable tech in your business.

Don’t blame others

If something goes wrong, don’t immediately become defensive and blame other people or other circumstances. Take a good look at your own processes and make changes. Even if what happened is someone else’s fault, blaming them publicly can easily spark a backlash and make things harder for you. Take them to task privately and work together to make the situation better.

Don’t waste time

Bad publicity can sometimes stem not from the act that caused the interest in the first place, but from the lack of response from the business involved. If something goes wrong, it is important to respond in a timely manner. Don’t rush it, of course; this can make things worse. Take a little time to gather your thoughts and respond in a measured way, but not so much time that people start to think you don’t care.

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Steve Conway

Steve Conway

Steve Conway is a content marketing professional and inbound marketing expert. Previously, Steve worked as a marketing manager for a tech software start-up. He is passionate about discovering new software that will that will advance his already well-honed digital marketing techniques.

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